One Global Caliphate!

15 08 2007

In the last few years, the words Caliphate/Khilafah or the Islamic State have been used as discussion point between Musilms, Non-Muslims, Politicians, Media and everyone else concerned.

However, it seems there is lack of uniformity in terms of what people understand this term to mean. Different segments of society, groups, and individuals perceive the notion of Islamic State according to their own line of political/spiritual thinking. For some, it is a totalitarian state, others consider it a state with democratic framework with shura, a republican state where authority belongs to the people, or just any civilian form of government, dictatorship, or monarchy… providing the ruler is good and the supremacy is for Shari ah. Though, there seems to be a consensus amongst all Islamic schools of thought about the supremacy of Shariah.

I use the term, Ideal Islamic Polity, to describe the Islamic notion of State as I understand it. This ideal State was the State of Madinah, which the Prophet (saw) shaped entirely based upon Divine laws that impart social justice. The State of Madinah was not a Kingship, or Monarchy, much less a Dictatorship and it was not a Democracy. Islamic State, in its true perspective, is the Qur’anic State, neither totalitarian nor authoritarian. It cannot be described as a democracy, not the type of the Athenians where absolute power or sovereignty itself lies in the hands of the people, nor is it a Theocracy where the state is governed by sacerdotal class, for Islam does not countenance sacerdotalism in any form. To sum up, life in an Islamic State is treated as a composite whole, all its components, political, economical, social, and others are managed and controlled by Islamic law.

Recently, I attended a conference in London organised by the Islamic group Hizb-utTahrir, highlighting their vision for the Global Caliphate. This conference was part of their global campaign, where similar conferences were organised throughout the world with largest one being in Indonesia which attracted 90,000. HuT is not the only one calling for this Global Caliphate, there are numerous other groups with similar ideals, though they differ in some aspects of the methodoly. I sat and heard their vision for the Caliphate… most of which I agree with as I too consider supremacy of Shariah to be a necessity. However, I can’t seem to understand the idea of ‘One Global Caliphate’ which is being propagated by such Islamic groups. And what is even more interesting though, is the kind of fear it strikes in the hearts of the western leaders, as if it’s a reality about to emerge!

I believe in unity of Muslims and Muslim lands. Ideally, Muslims should be united based on their creed without the artificial borders which disunite them on the basis of race and nations. However, it seems too complex to imagine how a Caliphate would rise in a particular Muslim country and somehow manage to unite the whole of Muslim world under one leadership, creating the ‘One Global Caliphate’. Even if it became a reality, such an idea would cause devastation, bloodshed of millions and the very picture of an angelic State which is being drawn would never surface.

I am now having to question the idea of ‘One Global Caliphate’, where the entire Muslim world would be ruled by the one Caliph (ruler). Upon research, it seems that it is argued by most Scholars of the past and present that there may be two Caliphs or more. They maintain this on the basis that many Caliphs existed at one time, in Iraq, of the Abbassids and the other, in Spain, of the Ummayads. The Muslim scholars of the time, who were also shrewd political theorists accepted the existence of multiple States as long as the supreme rule was the Shariah. Further, it is asserted that there was, after the demise of Prophet (saw) and before the election of Abu Bakr (ra) to Caliphate, a proposal made at the Saqifah meeting, for two Caliphs, one from the Ansaar and one from the Muhajireen. This proposal was dismissed on the account of the Prophet (saw) saying: “Imaams are of the Quraysh”. Perhaps, if it was not for this saying two Caliphs would have been accepted.

Some scholars, like Ibn Taimiyya hold that the Caliphate is no more now as the Prophet (saw) predicted: “After me there will be a Caliphate for thirty years, then it will become a Tyrannical Kingdom.” Some past Scholars separated Caliphate as Khasaa (specific) and ‘Amma (general) from rulership. Although, there may have been a powerless hereditary Caliph somewhere in Egypt, but the reigns of Power were in the hands of various Sultans who ruled over independent Sultanates where Shariah was supreme. The Scholars of the past who wrote in volumes to address the situation of the Muslims had not seen the existence of various Sultanates to be a problem. On the contrary, they had ordered their followers to ‘obey the rulers..as long as they command the good and forbid the evil’ and spoke against rebellion.

With regards to the idea of Islamic State today, I find the position of classical scholars to be correct. Islam does not attach much importance to the outward form and is satisfied if the Islamic Law is applied in its totality and decisions are taken after consultation in compliance with the Qur’anic verse; “Their affairs are conducted by mutual consultation” (42:38). There is no such thing as a ‘blue print’ for the Caliphate prescribed by the Qur’an and Sunnah. We have the model of Madinah and those of Khulafah Rashidun, and some examples of good governance from the Umayyads, Abbasids in Spain, Memluks and Ottomans could be used as guidelines. I believe, the procedure, the duration of representation, administration, economy should all be left open to interpretation, to be applied as it suits the occasion, time and place.

The public opinion for Islamic Shariah is gaining momentum in the Muslim world, and the recent victory of the ‘Islamists’ in Turkey over the secularist speaks volumes. I believe in these times, we have to utilise what we have to bring about social justice in Muslim countries as prescribed by Qur’an and Sunnah, and more importantly to Islamically educate the masses. The idea of ‘One Global Caliphate’, it sounds far too complex… unless, someone is about to simplify it for me. *confused*

Advertisements

Actions

Information

60 responses

16 08 2007
Hekmaa

Very interesting post.

The blue print for the Kilafah is something very detailed and it is not something we find in text discussed in everyday classes and schools. The magnitude of the system, the knowledge, the virtue to execute and practice it, in most cases never was something that a person learnt of a book, but rather something from Allah SAW. Therefore to try and find it in the writings of a scholar or books, will only bring one to find narrations as you mentioned of the success of certain Khaleefs rather than a formula.

However the Quran is the blue print for khilafa, though that sounds simple, it is a very great thing to really understand the full extent of it.

By way of the Ayat of the Quran, we know that there has to be Khilafa on Earth. This Khilafa has also been explained as to what or whose Khaleef. Surah Baqara 2nd Quater Speaks about Allah sending Khaleef to Earth in the form of humans. Therefore the Khilaafat is always Khaleefatullah fil ard.

The only way a person can be Khaleefatullah fil ard, is if they follow the ahkam of Allah on Earth, hence Quran, and by way of “wa ma yantiqu anil hawa inhiya ilaa wahyunyuha, allama hu shedeedul quwa”, the practices and sayings of the Prophet SAW.

Then comes the explanation of the azaamaa of Khilafa, “inaa aradal amaanata alasamae wal ardi wal jibala fa abayna aynyahmil na haw, wa asfaqna minha wa hamallahal insan. Inahu kana thallooman jahaoola” Allah speaks about this amanah to carry the Rule of Allah on Earth, that it was offered to the heavens, earth and mountains and they all declined, and human kind took it on. Allah goes to mention, that it was a stupidenously foolish taking. By this we see how great this task is, yet we in the Alam al Arwaah made that packet to take it on, so we are bound to it.

With regards to who, how, where; Hadith of the Prophet SAW, there can only be 1 ruler over the Muslims, their can be Ameers in different area’s but only one Khaleef. This is the Sharaeeh set method. The scholars in the past have told their people to not rise against the rulers, etc, and that is because they understood the importance of baghawa. In Islam we have calibre in ahkam, by way of that, they saw it more important that there is order and rule rather than people toppling rulers. However we also see that the Scholars encouraged joined the forces of right over the oppressive rulers. Therefore these examples can not be used to justify singular king ships, or rulerships. The hadith quote about how after the Prophet SAW there will be oppressive kings, itself demonstrates that kings were not look at favourably.

This is very briefly put together, but the actually Hukoomah, is a seperate faculty in Islamic education. Different courses touch it lightly, but to understand it in depth one needs to sit with the Muhaqiqeen on this issue. I will write more inshallah after the comments.

16 08 2007
Tanvir

I much agree with analysis presented in article. Countries like Pakistan are political disaster.. what they don’t need is further chaos becuase it is already an Islamic State. Politicians and Islamist need to concentrate on tuning and amending the already Islamic constitution, a good leadership and as metioned, social justice to bring stability and peace.

23 12 2010
Sochin

It is not an Islamic state. It is a Muslim nation created by the British.
No Islamic state exists currently. An Islamic state is based on the laws of Qur’an and Sunnah and ijtihad of the scholars. If one existed now, people would see that Islam is justice, justice is Islam. And the state who protect and defend our brothers and sisters being persecuted all over the world and the puppets of the west we call our governments.

16 08 2007
Sohail A

Dear Editor

In your article you have contradicted yourself on various counts. In your own understanding of ideal Islamic State, a key component is the supremacy of Shareeah which you neglected towards the conclusion settling in for social justice alone and good ruler. You would agree that Islamic laws can only function when established in full, therefore the Islamic State must be entirely based on Islamic laws and not just any State with social justice.

A few articles you may like to read.

Did Khilafah only exist for 30 years?
http://www.hizb.org.uk/hizb/resources/islamic-knowledge/did-khilafah-only-exist-for-30-years.html

The obligation of having one Khalifah
http://www.khilafah.com/kcom/the-khilafah/issues/the-obligation-of-having-one-khalifah.html

Islam online session with Taji Mustafa (yesterday)
http://www.islamonline.net/livedialogue/english/Browse.asp?hGuestID=Fk9U12

Regards

16 08 2007
Bubbles

@ Sohail A

Social justice and good rulership implies the supremacy of a well implemented Shariah. There’s that hadith that says Allah favors a country where its citizens are treated justly even if that country is not an Islamic one. So I honestly don’t see the contradiction here.

16 08 2007
Hasmita

Did I read someone say Pakistan is an Islamic state?

I kind of agree with Tia. Religious obligation aside, is it even practical today to establish Khilafah? How would it come about? and how would all the muslim countries unite behind one leader?

yes, it is part of our belief to live by Shariah or Khilafah as they are divine obligations on every Muslim so is unity of Muslims and these would not be ordained had they not been possible. and we have many hadith which predict the return of the khilafah. But is it our duty to establish it or would it be established by the will of Allah (swt)??

16 08 2007
Hasmita

i have read a book called: rules of Islamic governance by Al-Mawardi, which explains in some details the ruling system of Islam.

16 08 2007
Shahrzad

Really strange theory!! I think not complex, but it is Impossible to have one Calighate. Now they can’t control one Iraq, how they can control 1 milliard muslims all over the world? Time of prophet(pbuh), population of muslims was not as much as now. and even time Abbasid, Ummayyid and others same.
They had almost similar customs, nationality and views.
If muslims want really unity, why we need turn the food around our neck and put it in mouth when We have Islamc organization? We just need to make it very active. We need to have something like UN. (of course not dependent to US!)
Anyway i think most muslim governments dont seek unity at all! If they wanted, they could gather these countries together and don’t loose more day to day.
See what they did in Lebanon-Israel war? You can read all book from first page πŸ˜‰

17 08 2007
Zahraa Q

No doubt, It is rather difficult to imagine the idea of one global caliphate. Some would even wrongly suggest that no such thing ever existed. If one was to take a cursory look at the history of empires, one could go as far as to prove no such empire ever existed as one block. What is true is that every empire which existed controlled its subjects, however apart, powerful, rich, there always existed a centralised government. Similarly, we had a centralised single leadership of Muslims which existed from the time of the Prophet (saw) until the last days of Dawlatul Usmaniyah (Ottoman Caliphate) in 1924. Central leadership which consisted of one Caliph and his entarouge had control over the affairs of the Muslims. At times some of the provinces and their appointed leaders became very powerful and began to act independently of the State, but this type of power struggle is natural and expected. Despite all of this occurring, the provinces carried on paying their taxes to the Caliph, renewing the pledge (ba’yah) and generally consulting the Caliph. We have to agree that such situation was not the ideal situation and it was the direct affect of the slow decline of the Musilms which took pace as the gab between the Musilms widened. Prophet (saw) and the Khulafah Rashideen had installed mechanism to protect the unity and the state, for example, the governors were changed on regular basis so no particular governor becomes a celebrated personality. This became neglected during the early days of Khilafah with Imam Muawiah who was governor of Syria, was left incharge for too long that he had established a strong support, henceforth the power struggle began. Therefore, its important tht history should never become source of our thinking, history should be viewed and studied to learn important lessons and to discover mistakes which should not be repeated.

One global Caliphate will emerge when Musilm themselves are ready to accept the idea, as you rightly observe, the public opinion for it is gaining momentum and eventually it will reach a point where Musilms will no longer tolerate the rulers installed over them and the injustices against them. As for bloodshed, it is these rulers who use brutal means to silence those who call for Islam, the Andijan massacre by Karimov of Uzbekistan, the blood bath in Waziristan and Lal Masjid by Musharaf of Pakistan to name but a few. Therefore is is expected that these rulers will resist the emergence of Caliphate and unity of Musilms causing bloodshed, but not if they are removed and stripped off their powers before hand.

17 08 2007
sophister

It looks like you have HT people trying to contradict you. The only thing I find problematic here is the notion that an islamic state can properly exist amongst the nation-state system that is the current setup of the world. This cutting/slicing/borderization (and thats not even a word) of muslims really puts a dent in the concept of an Islamic state. Are we gonna be just some piece of land that has strict borders, just like Israel? I think the idea of an islamic state has never existed in a world carved up the way it is now, and that produces some real problems like what do you do with ethnic identity (this is primarily what nation-states are based on) and nationalism that has become so severe in muslim countries?

18 08 2007
confusedaboutlife

tia brilliant asrticl! …this issue has been on my mind for some time I have hizb friends ..and they keep telling me you must work for a khilafa otherwise allah will ask on the day of judgment , but then you get ur jihadist who u must go to jihad otherwise allah will ask you about it on the day of judgment . each one seems scary , sometimes I feel their wont be any khilafah not mahdi comes out I mean thats how it looks right . Not a single country has succeedid in implementing the shariah correctly , suadi arabi fail , afghanistan fail , pakistan fail , and iran fail .
It just seems like our ummah looks like one BiG FAT MESS .
satan keeps dusting truth with his dust till you cant even tell which one is the filfth and which one isnt everything seems either to liberal or to extreme , so how would an islamic state work out with soooooo many different opinions out their and so many different islamic ideas out their .
anyways enough said can you recommend me a book I can read on the past khilafah that just generaly outlines it what happend ?

18 08 2007
confusedaboutlife

btw tia when I first saw your blog I thought you were a ht lol , it just looks like that with colours and the conference u went to I would have liked to go but someone I knwo would have freaked and not let me go lol .

18 08 2007
brnaeem

AA- Sophister, great points!

I think the premise of the nation-state is foreign to the khilafa. And because of such an inconsistency, we find the HT approach to a 21st century caliphate eerily mirroring the western form of governance, with legislative, executive, and judicial branches. How ironic is that?!

I have yet to find some real deep analysis of how the khilafa can be actualized in our day and age. Hekmaa presents the standard ‘Quran is our constitution’ slogan, but that just doesn’t fly in the real world. Also, Hasmita mentioned Mawardi’s work – how applicable is that to our times?

Tia, I agree that the end objective is to establish a form of governance in which the Shariah is supreme. But I have yet to find anyone with a realistic proposal of how such a ‘state’ would exist.

18 08 2007
Tia

Hekmaa, I understand that there is a detailed discussion on the Islamic ruling system and has been documented even more recently, but how credible is it in terms of applicability? Does it lay down premise for how the Caliphate would emerge and Muslim world united behind one leader? Currently, there exists a mass confusion regarding these particular questions amongst Musilms and Muslim groups. Firstly, there is no uniformity of thought regarding what Khilafah actually is. Secondly, how the world is divided and how shariah materialises as a system of governence. For example, the Jihadi school insists on declaring the Muslim world Dar al-Kufr, considering the governments as Taghout including their administration (ministers/army) and have declared Jihad against the regimes which in some way is adding to the fitnah and fassad which exists. On the other hand, we have the various Ikhwani schools who have compromised a great deal wanting to bring about a gradual change via political participation. HuT seems to be in between, they reject violence and they also reject gradualism, but they are still calling toward toppling regimes via popular revolution or military coup d’etate. How can regimes and system be changed peacefully?

Anywho, this is where the confusion begins. If we were to delve into the idea it becomes more and more complicated.

18 08 2007
Sumera

I agree with your points Tia, I too cannot understand how a Global Caliphate would work, and can only envisage it causing problems. How can one person (residing hundreds of miles away) “govern” various “countries”? These countries nonetheless will remain and wont become borderless I assume. Unless thats what HT mean by a Global Caliphate and so deem it being possible?

I side with the arguments made by Sophister and BrNaeem regarding how such a state would be possible altogether since there are things like nationalism, ethnic identity and all sorts that would need “sorting” out and I doubt people would let go of it quite as easily as its assumed.

Im not sure for those who pose a Caliphate as THE problem solver (in a short space of time too! Its the quick fast solution!) actually realistically think of it or have thought it through in being able to – will it really “solve” social problems? the gap between the rich and the poor? socio-economic and class differences? etc Some of these HT people, although wanting to do good and make a change, live on cloud 9. Same with some of the other groupies who sport their own causes I suppose.

lol confusedaboutlife – I too thought Tia was probably HT inclined if not also a member! Apologies to you Tia :p I was sent an invite to the conference, but it wasn’t my cup of tea. nor probably ever will be.

18 08 2007
Tia

Tanvir – I agree, what countries like Pakistan need is a good honest ruler for starters. However, none of the current political parties or rulers can do any good for Pakistan nor does the mish mash of political ideas help. Though, I have heard Imran Khan a few times and he seems to make alot of sense. I also think the Pakistani constitution needs to be scrapped, not that I am an expert on Pakistan or anything. πŸ™‚

Sohail – I purposly presented my argument in such way to demonstrate the clash of thoughts. We all agree on the fundamentals but the huge disagreement is how to get there. In my opinion, right now the most important thing for Muslim countries is the need for social justice, if that can be achieved, inevitably it will lead to transformation of society, though not in such radical fashion.
Thanks for the links, I will have a read later. Jzk.

Bubbles – That’s a wonderful hadith, which fits right in. Would you know the reference for it by any chance?

18 08 2007
Shahrzad

Islam is religion of all time. I think the Califate is a metaphor. He can be chief of The organization of Islamic Confernce. I believe that this organization can be such a government for all muslim world. Even more muslims who have big population in a country (like india) and their givernment is not islamic. Of course if it gets more powerful and active and be independent of west and spc US. I think even UN or EU took the idea from islam. In this way, each islamic country can have its independence. But they follow a clear and similar diplomacy. Even they can have same currency. The final goal is unity..

18 08 2007
Shahrzad

I remember during Mr Khatami’s presidential era, this organization of Islamic Confernce took place in Tehran. I was there in conference hall. There was very friendly atmosphere there. And i could see tears on so many eyes, when the somebody(Qari el Quran) read some verses of Quran for closing day of the conference. That was the first and the last time i got hopeful that maybe there will be a unity someday in muslim world..

18 08 2007
Tia

Hasmita, hey join the club πŸ˜‰

Shahrzad – good point. But I don’t have any confidence in any particular organization which we can rely on. We already have likes of OIC which have proven to be completly useless, esp when the representatives include despots, dictators and their chronies. Whereas if they were all true representatives who actually cared for the Muslims, the idea would be similar to existence of multiple Islamic States meeting to reach consensus on policies.

Zahraa, thanks for visiting and your interesting comment. History is something we can debate over because one can selectively pick aspects of history to correspond with thier line of thinking, so it may prove rather futile to debate over history. However, I did make reference to history and I take on board your point about history not being source of our thinking.
Zahraa, you didn’t answer my question though.

Sophister and brnaeem, you raise interesting bunch of questions and you know that is my quarrell with the ‘Ulemaa today, who have failed to address these issues for Muslims. I don’t know if you are familiar with Ibn Khaldun, I am currently reading one of his books called ‘al-Maqadimah’ which includes a chapter on dynastics, sultantes and caliphate. He presents a very interesting discussion into this subject and throughout his book he discusses Assabiyah (group feeling) which extends to modern day concept of ‘Nationalism’. Basically, he goes on to exaplin how its necessary for well being of a State, if the Assabiyah is towards Islam alone. Though, I have not yet completly understood his arguments to be able to explain it.

18 08 2007
Tia

Confusedaboutlife sis you can join the club with me and Hasmita πŸ™‚
Oh, and ther is a book called ‘how the khilafah was destroyed’ by Abdal Qadim Zalloum (ht). Its a good book which analysis historical facts which led to the decline and fall of the Caliphate. And lol noo, I am not HT, I am a freelance activist πŸ™‚

Sumera its ok, depending on the mood I am in I can come across as a Jihadi, Salafi, Sufi and sometimes just plain stupid :p

18 08 2007
Shahrzad

We need a short term goal for unity and along the short term goal, a long term one that makes the unity stable. Your point about despots, dictators and their chronies is comepletely right. I agree that yet in so many muslim countries there is not even one election for every 20 years.Unfortunately organizations like this came to be useless, bcs no muslim government supports them.. But at least we need a point to start. We can not make revolution in all countries who have dictators. We can not live with dreams. So for now i think if we concentrate on something like what europians have (i told you that they took the idea from islam) and if we make OIC active and powerful, it will work to achieve short term goals..

18 08 2007
Sumera

Ahh a free spirit πŸ˜€ Best way to be!

If somehow Muslims WERE able to have similar feelings towards Islam as they do towards nationalism (assabiyah as you mentioned ) wouldnt there always be something they’d quarrel over and create mini groups from and with? Surely that feeling would just be transferred to something else? (salafi’s vs sufi’s vs barelvi’s vs shia’s on and on it goes? Or am I being a tad too pessimistic!)

19 08 2007
Zahraa

Tia which question would you like answered?

Nationalism and Nation States is a modern yet a very shallow idea, it restricts progression and has failed miserably in the Muslim countries as a political doctrine. The idea of Nationalism is already causing problems in countries like Pakistan, where the people of Tribal areas are inclined towards Afghanistan being stopped by the border line. Muslims are already united, emotionally that is and the nationalistic identities they have adopted are weak and their emotions for Islam transcend their nationalistic identities.

BrNaeem: HT has drawn up a constitution a summary of which is available on various websites, we have also detailed the economic, social, ruling, judicial systems of the future Caliphate.

The re-establishment of an Islamic Khilafah State is an obligation, it is not permissable for Muslims to live without it as Islam simply cannot function without it.

I would like to invite the participants here to listen to the presentations delivered at the HT London conference especially the expert panel, now available online at hizb.org.uk

19 08 2007
Sumera

Nationalism (or at least ethnic identity) has been around since time immemorial. We only need to refer back to the era of the Prophet (saw) and see the rants of superiority the Arabs spouted about being Arab and how they belittled those who were non-Arab/Black. Yes, it was addressed that no one is better than another except in piety, but the underlying inclination towards their “own kind” is always bubbling underneath.

True in Pakistan they dont look too favourably upon the Afghan’s emigrating in their droves to the country. I can’t recall the displaced Palestinians being welcomed with open arms by their neighbouring countries when they fleed either. The same attitude towards asylum seekers, refugee’s and even migrant workers are apparent in the UK – theres some bizarre level of hatred towards the Poles who have come here for work. And it was similar when immigrants from the Indian subcontinent and other countries colonised by the British came here for work. They weren’t looked upon too favourably either and even til this day the children of these immigrants get some flack. So its always “there” and probably will remain so.

For arguments sake, where is this State going to be created? How will they pick a Caliph? Who decides where he’ll be situated? Will he be privy to the states of these countries and therefore deal with them accordingly and differently from country to country? What aboout countries, will their borders be torn down? How will that occur and be decided; would it depend on where the Caliph is and so would be tailored around that?

All these questions bring to mind another thing; its quite similar to how people sit calculating Day of Judgement being near and becoming pre-occupied with it when its not something within our control or grasp. People may be keen on having Shariah law implemented and perhaps there being a caliph, but not at the idea of having one global caliphate since its complex if not near impossible and resembles a “one size fits all” scenario.

19 08 2007
confusedaboutlife

sumera- their is som bizar hate for the poles lol
do you know why sumera ? becuase they have become a cheap labour alternative for many businesses , becuase they accept any salary and work cheap . But I blame this one th government

I think its sad that people dont have any mercy for their neighbouring countries I mean for the sake of allah , this earth is free , people can live werever they wish , especialy when their country is not stable why are you so damm selfish !?

19 08 2007
confusedaboutlife

sumera- basicaly the poles are blamed for taking all the jobs and bring down the salary pay

19 08 2007
Sumera

Well, the Poles are just doing what the Pakistani’s,Indians and Bengali’s did when they came over! :p

19 08 2007
Tia

Zahraa, the same questions I always ask … Sumera articulated it well. These are real problems faced by Muslims which are not going to be solve by concepts alone.

19 08 2007
Bubbles

I’ll have a look around for it Tia. (Times like this I want to bang my head against the wall for not writing it down somewhere…)

But wait wait wait… I think it was in Sayyid Qutb’s “Milestones”. Unfortunately my own copy isn’t here… cuz I remember highlighing all the interesting hadith’s I came across.

19 08 2007
Shahrzad
20 08 2007
Tia

I have the book Milestones, I will have a look. πŸ™‚

Thanks Bubble, and shahrzad for the link.

20 08 2007
Tia

On the topic of having Two Imams (Caliphs), Imam Al-Haramain al-Juwayni (teacher of Imam al-Ghazali) says:

“Our associates agree on precluding the investing of two different individuals with the imamate at either end of the world…. My opinion on this issue is that investiture of two individuals with the imamate in a single locality within relatively restricted boundaries and limited provinces is not permitted and the investiture should be in accord with the consensus. But, when the distances are great and the two Imams quiet remote from each other, there is room to allow it…” (Kitab al-Irshad..)

According to him, we cannot have two leaders in one place, ie, each Dar al-Islam there would only be one Imam/Khaleefah/Sultan! however, there may be several dar al-Islams..

20 08 2007
Sumera

Well I can’t see how one caliph in Australia for arguments sake would be able to handle affairs of UK, the Indian subcontinent or even Eastern Europe since things may very well be different in those places (different issues etc) and distance (regardless of it being easy to travel nowadays) would be a variable that would have some effect on being able to govern adequately. This is just a minute fraction of issues and factors that would need to be take into consideration if the concept of a global caliphate is to get off the ground and into practice.

20 08 2007
Sumera

So I think distance would be taken into account, or would need to be taken into account and so you may very well have several dar al-islaams. πŸ˜€

21 08 2007
Zahraa

It should not be so difficult to grasp the idea of one state if we look to the reality of the world. The US is almost managing the affairs of the world from Washington by installing puppet regimes and through Capitalism, IMF, economic sanctions, and various other such tools. In similar fashion, Britain, a tiny Island colonised much of Africa, India and the Arab world. In the past, Islamic State too spread as far as India and Spain within the first 100 years of its establishment, despite the communication barriers. The Caliph will not be a one man running half the world, he will have his appointed governors (Wali) over each region, he will have his delegated and executive assistants, generals and basically a fully developed State structure based on the example of the Khulafah Rashideen.

The Islamic State does not believe in borders or any type of national identity, it is an expansionist State, continously expanding until it dominates the world because Islam came to dominate the world, until Allah’s law is supereme and the justice and mercy of Islam is everywhere. This is based on various Ayahs of Qur’an.

26 08 2007
Tia

Zahraa, we may agree to disagree on some issues, but what I am not being answered for is how the one Caliphate will emerge and how will borders and national identities be eliminated in favour of one Caliphate.. without violence/bloodshed that is??

26 08 2007
2jay

“One Global Caliphate” … the world is not ready for this yet. What is important now in most countries is to have a good set of capable, honest, transparent and just Leaders/Rulers governing a country free from corruption and nepotism providing equal opportunities for all, allowing the people to enjoy their rights fully as citizens and giving their freedom as human to choose and practice whatever faith they wish to adopt.

26 08 2007
Sumera

Good luck implementing this global caliphate, I for one dont expect to be waiting with bated breath.

27 08 2007
Zahraa

Tia exactly how do you propose a dar al-Islam to emerge? how does a political change occur? as for national identities I have already explained that they are shallow thoughts which came about as a reaction to how the Muslim world was suddenly divided. It will take just as long to reverse the process as it took Mustafa Kemal to secularise the Turkish nation because any society is run by system driven by thought, the stronger the thought the stronger the society. Muslim countries today hold on to shallow thoughts which mirrors their progress, once it is replaced by progressive intellectual Islamic thoughts, we will witness a unique generation rise. And Tia, you have been ambigious about the idea of Dar al-Islam, i thought you were proponent of the ikhwani argument of working within the system but it seems in your latest entry you have attacked this idea too…

2jay we can at least concede to concur that Muslim people should be allowed to decide thier own political destiny, in which case I can confidently say Muslims do not want a dictatorship nor the hypocritical democracy, they want Islam and they want Caliphate. This fact was revealed in the recent survey conducted by university of Maryland where overwhelming majority of Muslims would like to live under Shariah.

Sumera the idea of one global caliphate is not figment of one’s imagination, its a reality about to emerge together with textual evidence confirming its rise. We need to be optimistic and as Tia said: ‘And what is even more interesting though, is the kind of fear it strikes in the hearts of the western leaders, as if it’s a reality about to emerge!’ The politicians are pretty convinced of its emergence, Tony Blair recently organised a conference in cambridge with leading Muslim so called scolars to help him defuse the burning desire for Calipahte amongst Muslims.

27 08 2007
Shahrzad

There is a famous hadith narrated by Abdullah ibn Mas’ud in which the Prophet said: “Even if a (single) day is left in (the life of) the world, Allah will lengthen that day to send a person of my House whose name will be like my name and whose Kunyah will be similar to mine. He will fill the world with justice and equity just as it was previously full of injustice and oppression”. (Abu Daud, Tabarani, Ibn Hibban, Hakim, Ibn Maja, Abu Na’im, Ibn Asakir etc).

Zahra, maybe for that caliphate you say, in addition to situation of muslim world, division between muslim and lack of unity even between muslim people in a country, for one global chaliphate we need to wait for that awaited saviour..?!!

27 08 2007
Sumera

Zahraa, the idea of a Caliphate is all very well, and even with the idea of a Global Caliphate, but to me its almost as if people are trying to run before they can walk. There are these “concepts” but there doesnt seem to be much thought put behind them, as if people will accept it overnight, purely because “this is what Islam mandates” – if people were as robotic as that then life would be simpler.

The only thing “rising” is people’s desire for it. Thats because what they;ve experienced so far (the increasing secularism) is not what they want, the scapegoat tactics, the racist behaviour towards them (towards Muslims that is) amongst a few other things and the ultimate cherry on the cake is the way in which they romanticise Caliphate as being a problem solver.

They are absorbed in the idea of it, and with any idea thats banded about and spoken about as often as Caliphate is, its bound to distress and worry those who see it as a threat to topple them and infact “infringe” on their way of life (the “West” or “Westernised nations”), particularly if its fronted by groups who are activists for political Islam. But whether that “threat” is real or whether its on the “brink of becoming a reality” is not as easy to measure or gauge as some groups think it is, and the opinion of it being a reality varies depending on how “involved” you are in such matters, which is why HT members think its around the corner. Ask any other random person; they’d have a different opinion and view on this “emergence”.

The other queries seem to go unanswered, queries of where is this global caliphate going to emerge from, which country?, who picks this Caliph?, and on what conditions do we judge this man to be “fit” enough for the “job”? and then how will he pick his “governers”?, what happens to countries, their borders, their identities.?

Aside from this miraculous “educating” thats meant to occur – if removing the notion of identity from people was all that easy, then it has to be recognised if country of birth as an identity is successfully removed, then they will simply replace it with something else – and Islamically that’ll probably be which line/school of thought you follow. Which in itself will bring about infighting, refusal to attend mosques run by that particular group of people etc – infact it occurs already, and this is in despite of this message of “brotherhood” we’re meant to follow. People are not conditioned in the way Pavlov conditioned dogs in his experiment, and its quite ambitious to expect things to be reversed in the amount of time it took people to accept secularism, since they are not even comparable things.

Its all muddy ground and doesnt seem to have been thought through – and it certainly seems to be quite hard to bring about through “non-violent” means as is of course the way HT’s works. Does HT anticipate this change to occur through mass education programmes?

(Sorry for the long comment Tia! Apologies for hogging your comment space)

27 08 2007
Tia

Sumera no need to apologise, I have hogged your comment space and well you are really hitting the points. πŸ˜‰

*Waits Zahraa’s comeback and how she wiggles out of it this time πŸ™‚

27 08 2007
Pacific

Interesting

27 08 2007
Pacific

Allah gives victory to those people who deserve that. When we see the spiritual condition of the average Muslim people in the Muslim lands , do they really deserve a Khilafah ? Instead of uplifting the Muslims spiritually first , some people are focused on the Khilafah-building.

I suspect a subtle conspiracy. Is this race to the global Khilafat a clever strategy to frighten the non-Muslim people ? The following links support this
suspicion

##################
http://www.serendipity.li/wot/livingstone.htm
http://www.serendipity.li/wot/livingstone_reply.htm
http://www.redmoonrising.com/Ikhwan/Clash.htm

Following the dictates of Hegelian dialectic, the Globalists have created two antagonizing forces, the “Liberal-Democratic” West, against Terrorism, or “political Islam”, to force us into the acceptance of their final alternative, a New World Order.

The West and Islam have had a long era of compatibility, but this history has been denied to foster the myth of a “Clash of Civilizations”. In order to inflame the sentiments of the West against Islam, our attention has been focused on the specter of fanatical Wahhabism and political Islam.

http://www.fortunecity.com/boozers/bridge/632/history.html —-Jewish blood in Saudi Family

http://www.ken-welch.com/Reports/Zawahiri.html

However, as outlined in an excellent article by Peter Goodgame, The Globalists and the Islamists, the Globalists have had a hand in shaping and financing all the terrorist organizations of the twentieth century, including the Muslim Brotherhood of Egypt.

But the history of their duplicity dates farther back still, to the 18th Century, when British Freemasons created the Wahhabi sect of Saudi Arabia itself, to further their imperialistic objectives.

http://www.thetruthseeker.co.uk/article.asp?ID=6670

The top rung of Freemasonry, the Illuminati are a loose alliance (like the mob)of Jewish finance and British/America/European aristocracy joined by marriage, money and belief in the occult (Freemasonry.)The Jesuits who control the Vatican are also on board.

the Illuminati consist of selected members of dynastic Jewish central banking families intermarried with Euro-American aristocracy, along with Jesuits, who have reached the highest degrees of Kabalistic Freemasonry.

http://www.savethemales.ca/001936.html

——– Islamic view ———–

http://www.missionislam.com/nwo/index.htm
http://www.missionislam.com/nwo/secretworld.htm
http://antimasons.8m.com/intro.htm

http://www.propagandamatrix.com/articles/july2007/160707BBC.htm
http://stj911.com/ryan/TruthInCredentials.html
http://worldtradecentertruth.com/volume/200609/DrJonesTalksatISUPhysicsDepartment.pdf

28 08 2007
Zahraa

Shahrzad it is in the knowedge of Allah (swt) alone when it will rise and who the leader will be, but we have the certainty that it will rise. The vital issue for Muslims across the world is not the fact that when it will occur or who the leader will be but rather what is our duty towards it, because the obligation of Khilafah is upon our necks.

Sumera what you have outlined to a certain extent is all correct. There is a burning desire for Caliphate amongst Muslims, and its not only a desire rather a want, which is a big step from 50 years ago. People of even the most secular countries like Turkey are voting in the Islamists which may indicate people’s confidence in Islam is increasing.

In terms of where it will emerge? that is purely dependent upon the political stability, environment, public opinion, strategic positioning and so on, currently in the Muslim countries all of that is changing rapidly leaving political vacuum. The administration of the khilafah will be according to the model of Khulafah rashidun and the matter will most probably rest with the Ahlul Hali wal ‘Aqd from amongst the influentials. The same with governors, they will be picked and designated based on how Prophet (saw) chose and installed governors over conquered regions.

Ideally the education system of Islam will create a generation of Muslims who will be nurtured to have their allegiance to Islam and Khilafah. In countries like Pakistan the nationalistic emotions are enforced every morning when children are to listen to the national anthem and salute the flag, these will be replaced. Secondly, the difference of opinion amongst Muslims has existed from the early days of Islam, it caused conflicts but the Islamic state was able to create harmony in society not only between Muslims with different opinions but also Christian and Jews who all lived together.

with all of this, we understand and believe that Islam is perfect with a perfect system to govern human beings. So the problem is not with Islam, the problem is with the human beings who are not able to either understand the perfect nature of Islam or simply can’t imagine how Islam can’t solve their problem. Though, what is clear to me at least is that we can’t refer to any system other than Islam, be it Capitalism or socialism, the solution to all our problems are in Islam, and if we can’t see these solutions we must exert them. We can’t be defeatist, nor come to take solutions from reality nor pick and mix. To me, this is what it means to follow Islam comprehensively.

28 08 2007
Sumera

There is quite a difference in voting for Islamic parties, liking the idea of a caliphate, desiring for caliphate and actually having a caliphate in place.

It is quite an assumption to make that countries are voting in Islamic parties because they want a caliphate, when infact a more realistic assumption would be that they are voting in these parties because they are tired of the way their countries have been run by the various governments and their various ways and the disparities as a result, the increasing secularism, the banning of hijaab and other religious attire in public spheres of life etc and they believe going back to Islam may provide an answer to the ills and problems they are facing. And it probably does if implemented properly.

MQM in Pakistan is slowly becoming popular, and why is that? It isn’t because people want a caliphate, its because the governments they’ve had have been appalling and have sucked the country dry of its resources, wealth and status. And they think MQM may be a better choice. But if they ever had any inkling that MQM were Talibaneque then they would never vote them in (unless they were pro-Taliban). So thats quite different from making the link of voting in Islamic parties = wanting caliphate.

And the claim of “feeding” nationalism to children via morning rituals in schools as being the absolute cause of nationalism is an argument that lacks depth. The Catholic schools here have their Catholic teachers do their daily assembly and sing hymns, but very little of it has any impact on the children. If the values and ideas are supplemented at home and outside of school, then its paid attention to, believed in and incorporated in their lives. So its not really “conditioning” per se and these feelings of nationalism are brought about in similar ways.

Do Muslims even sincerely know what/how a caliphate is like? Do they understand it? I doubt it, they probably understand it as much as the youth understand jihaad against the kaffirs is the way forward and “progressive” and how bin Laden is the “top dawg”.

If a collective group of intellectuals pick the Caliph then of course that’d depend on who these people were, would it not? If a caliphate is put in place that is basically a mirror of the “scholars” that Al-Azhar regurgitates, or the rote-learned ones from “universities” in the Indian subcontinent, and the appointed governers are their cronies or who affiliate with the same line of parrotted thinking or braindead thought then it’ll collapse quicker than a lead balloon.

Tia, im sure you’d agree with that! :p

So what would come first, according to HT? Implementing this “global caliphate” or the mass Islamic education and awareness programmes? Dont get me wrong, I think its very ambitious of HT to have such goals and objectives and the members certainly seemed convinced of this inevitable arrival of a caliphate to be very near (a global one at that), but somewhere along the lines I think theres much hot air and “excitability” of it all and little acknowledgement of the factors involved that will definitely contribute to difficulties in its implementation.

28 08 2007
Zahraa

The fact that these Islamist parties are being voted in means two things: 1) that there is a desire for shariah and as you pointed out poeple are tired of other isms. 2) People want shariah but they are confused as to what exactly is Shariah (as you pointed out), this explains why they would vote in Gul or brotherhood when they can do very little in terms of Islamic reformation without support of the army. What is clear from this is that there is serious lack of insight amongst Muslim masses.

MQM? I really do hope you mean MMA because there is a stark difference between the two.

We have to appreciate that not every single Muslim is going to want Khilafah because most people are not really bothered like all other people of the world how they are governed. (Tia made that point in a previous entry). Not every single citizen of Great Britain agreed or was aware of the cause of its misery being the theocratic state and its salvation resting in seperation of religion from state and Capitalism through the renaissance. Once the change occured vast majority of the people were unaccepting of the changes, for example the peasents were reluctant to use the new banking system because it involved usuary. Capitalism was thought of by the elite class of intellectuals and bankers who developed sciences of marketing, psychology, print media and so forth to change the public opinion and the industrial revolution being the final nial. I don’t mean to give a boring history lesson because I am sure you are aware of all this, I am trying to illustrate how a radical change can occur in society and this idea of change is not something new. Khair, what concerns the masses is that their interests are secured, which the Islamic state will ensure since the Islamic ecnomic system is based on distribution of wealth unlike the west, and it will guarantee food, shelter and clothing to every citizen. It will cultivate the lands, free the peasents from landlords and free them from shackles of Capitalism and usury.

As for the Khaleefah, he will be an elected leader, every single Muslim has to give him the Bayah according to the Hadith, “whosoever dies without the pledge of allegiance (to khaleefah) on his neck dies the death of days of Jahilliyah”. The Ahlal Hali wal Aqd may include Army generals, politicians, thinkers, scholars and wide range of people who may appoint many people through recommendations or nominations out of whom one would be elected as the Khaleefah.

I am sure Tia would agree with this, but it would be interesting to see her reply to my previous comment. πŸ™‚

And Sumera your final comment which I will address was a bit too sarcy, I almost laughed, do you have some ht friend you don’t get on with or something? I know Tia has :p Now, to answer the question, HT is a political party with a difference being it holds on the Islamic ideology without compromise strictly following the method of Prophet (Saw) from Makkah to Madinah. HT does not believe in educational, economical, scientific basis for revival, it believes all of these to be the product of the revival. What it does believe in is to create confiedence in Islamic thought, therefore it addresses the problems of the Muslim world showing how Islam as an ideological alternative can solve these problems, through leafelts, books, talks, conferences, debates, websites and all permissable means. It’s members contact influential people such as army personnel in the Musilm world to give them Da’wah (to Islam in its entirety). It also works to create public opinion for the Khilafah, for example with conferences that were held last month throughout the Muslim world and the west, where Indonesia pulled a shocking audience of 100,000 which has made Khilafah the talking point amongst the journalist, thinkers and politicians as something serious. And yes you are right, Khilafah is not coming tomorrow or next week, but the excitement is sign of hope and victory of Allah being near as this is part of our Imaan. We may have an easy life here in the UK but vast majority of the Muslims in Palestine, Iraq, Kashmir, Afghanistan, Central Asia, China, even Pakistan these days are holding on to Islam like holding on to hot coal, they deserve the victory of Allah.

29 08 2007
Tia

“Tia exactly how do you propose a dar al-Islam to emerge? ”

Sorry for not answering this, honestly I don’t have an answer. I am not a Mujtahid or a political party who could give an accurate answer. I am just average joe trying to make sense of things along with other fellow bloggers.

I like your example of renaissance, in fact I often use it myself as you know. What I can’t seem to understand is ONE global Caliphate. The most peaceful way to achieve that would be multiple coup d’etates, now tell me when was the last time we saw that happening in the history?

Hey Zahraa, I like Sumera’s sarcasm. And there is no need to make it out as if its all about those phone calls you never returned, or the fact that I was having to throw M&M’s at random people out of utter boredom at your conference because you were too busy ‘stewarding’ *roll eyes* This is clearly about your concept of ‘global caliphate’ and us not being able to understand it along with your failure to explain it.. which I still appreciate. πŸ˜‰

29 08 2007
Sumera

I only know of one HT member personally and I can’t say I dont get on with them – we get on very well! Even if I do say so myself :p πŸ˜€ Besides, my comments aren’t personal at all, that’d be an incredibly petty method of having a discussion and basing opinions and view on. And by the way my last comment wasn’t meant to be sarcastic either :p (oh and apologies, I was meant to say MMA – was watching something on TV about MQM just before I came to Tia’s blog!)

Its an assumption that people voting in Islamic parties want Shariah in place, particularly as you’ve also agreed with my point that most people don’t have any notion of what Shariah is, and what they do know of it, they certainly don’t see its appeal and so are relatively clueless. And as you also pointed out that not every Muslim may want a Caliphate, so they probably wouldnt pay allegiance to it either. Which I suppose would mean they’d end up teetering near the edge of the Pit. Well who would pay allegiance particularly as I mentioned previously if it meant paying allegiance to a caliphate that compromises of have people similar to those out of touch scholars that Al-Azhar produces. No-one seems to answer this, all you keep mentioning are the “Ahlul Hali wal Aqd” without actually really knowing who this will be, who assigns themselves, or how they are assigned, to be amongst this group of people, and where they’ll spring up from (granted much of this would depend on how things are, what the circumstances are etc but its incredibly vague regardless).

If say for arguments sake, it is people like those scholars from al-azhar who end up, so many years down the line, having influence, and position and label themselves as “cream of the crop” and THEY assign a Caliph (in co-op with all their chums who are also relatively clueless) and the various governers in various countries, (although the concept of one GLOBAL caliphate has holes in it itself) can anyone not see how disasterous such a thing would be? And wouldnt there be conflict over who decides they are amongst “Ahlul Hali wal Aqd”, and if not, why are they not included? etc

I’ve heard about all this creating confidence in Islamic thought by demonstrating to people Islam has the answers etc etc numerous times, and thats all nice and well, but I actually can’t see that happening, I see the opposite. And the hot bed of talk around Khalifa in Muslim countries is usually more often than not a red light for those who aren’t vaguely interested in a Caliphate per se, but wish to manipulate by because they know how comfortable their rear end will be to have a seat with power and influence to sit on.

All I see in this day and age is people seeing Islam as rigid, regressive and oppressive and this is in despite of everything and every effort people are putting in to demonstrate the opposite. The Islamic education that Muslims are being taught is more fatalistic than optimistic, that is if they are being taught anything substantial apart from the stuff you hear some Imams come out with (they make you cringe with embarassment!) – the quality of education is very very poor and is masked behind other agenda’s and self-interests.

30 08 2007
Hasmita

good points Sumera and Zahraa.

1 09 2007
Zahraa

Sumera I think you slightly misunderstood my point about most people not being concerned. I agree that most people don’t have any notion of what Shariah is. There are two perspectives on it, Muslim not being aware of shariah is part of the decline which needs to be reversed, hence the dire need to create awareness for shariah and caliphate through different mediums. Secondly, most people are not bothered with ideological details concerning governence, what their concern is justice, food and shelter. If we look to Pakistan, the vast majority of the people call for democracy not because they believe in it, rather they hope it may solve their problem, when it previously failed, they warmly accepted Musharaf, and for years they defended his reformations but there hopes were shattered. It now seems Bhutto who has been dismissed on charges of corruption twice may come back to power holding the banner of democracy. In the last elections MMA stood out, despite being just ‘Mullahs’ were given chance in hope they may restore justice and good honest government. In that sense most of the politically unaware people are not concerned if its democracy, dictatorship, socialism or Khilafah, what they want in reality is good governence. In Muslim countries, the discussions at coffee tables are not khilafah, democracy or socialism, the discussion are in criticism of the government, its corruption, lack of social justice, mismanagement of affairs by the rulers and them being lackey of the west. The Khilafah State will provide good governence based on Quran and Sunnah, with equality, justice, high values being its core, an elected government with independent judiciary and providing food, shelter, and clothing for every citizen being the shariah principles without which there is no khilafah. Who will complain as long as there is good governence? most certainly not the majority who only want to live peacefully in a society which will cater for them and their future generations.

I agree with most of the rest, about these so called scholars, the current education system, the madrassah education all of it is infact part of the decline, which has to be reversed. However a quick fix is not going to solve that, what we need is a system which implements an education system as dynamic as we had in the past, where Arabic language will be taught, and people leaving higher education will leave with sufficient knowledge to understand Islamic law to account the government, its adoptions and fruther be able to pursue becoming Mujtahideen.

I think its the way Tia brough up discussion of Global Caliphate which is causing a disagreement here. The idea of global caliphate is an Islamic concept, its purpose of Islam to eliminate fitnah and to make Allah’s deen dominant, and the unity of Muslims being obligatory. What we are not saying is that all of that will happen overnight, that would be wishful thinking because it can’t be expected to all happen one day. The expansion of Islamic State and unity of Muslim lands will be a gradual process which may take a year or 100 years from the point the Khilafah is established in any particular Muslim country which fulfils the pre-req.

1 09 2007
Sumera

Its not really down to how Tia presented it, its the concept in itself that seems a bit “ambitious” considering how today’s world is – what with countries and their borders, ethnic groups and how it’ll be brought about via bloodless “coup” etc.

Anyway we’ll see what happens with this as time goes on.

1 09 2007
Zahraa

of course, there are many challenges in the way, with an intense political, intellectual and cultural struggle ahead of us all and as muslims we have to struggle for our cause. Our responsibility is to do what is in our control to the best of our ability for our own accountability with the belief that all results are from Allah (swt) alone. In terms of being ‘ambitious’, that in itself is part of our belief as displayed by Prophet (saw) himself. When the Muslims were weak and being persecuted in Makkah he gave them vision of security and glad tidings. When he along with Abu Bakr migrated to Madinah the Quraish sent the best of bounty hunters to catch him dead or alive, when Suraqah caught up with them, Prophet (saw) promised him the gold bangles of Persia. Later during the time of Umar (ra) when Persia was conquered, Suraqah was called upon and given his prize. During the battle of trenches when all the enemies had sorrounded the city and Muslims were digging trenches whilst starving and fear had struck them Prophet (saw) gave them vision of conquering Constantinople and Rome. Liekwise, we know Allah’s victory will come, we know Muslims will be united, there will be Khilafah once against after tyranical rule (Mulkaan), so we are not being wishful but having hope and reaching out to meet those goals which is the ultimate abode of Muslim ummah. πŸ™‚

3 09 2007
Tia

Many thanks everyone for contributing in this discussion, particularly Sumera and Zahraa. One thing we must agree upon is that like all other matters of jurisprudence the matter of Caliphate requires research, clarity, and a collective Islamic stance towards it, in order for it to come in existence and be able to function.

5 09 2007
Mohammed A Aziz

A solution could be under our noses.
——–
Qur’anic verse; β€œTheir affairs are conducted by mutual consultation” (42:38).
——
Khilafat is possible
“United Muslim Council For Khilafat” (UMCK)
1- Representation from each (muslim) country ( Or from all Muslim regions)
2- Prescribed Qualification for each member
3-A Constitution (based on sharia)
4-Election of Khalifa from amongst the members (to serv a term) or
4b- A panel to serv in the form of a “Khilafat”

23 12 2010
Sochin

Wake up call. Muslims. We don’t base our deen on our opinions or subjective political ideals. We base them on the Qur’an and Sunnah, any statement you make, whether about caliphate or halal/haraam, must have evidence on Qur’an and Sunnah.
“There is no compulsion in religion” (2:256)
Once we come to the rational belief of One Creator, Unique in Lordship, Worship and Names and Attributes. We follow the evidences of the Qur’an and Sunnah and align our desires with His Almighty Will.

Muslims shouldn’t be confused. Our deen is complete. You need to go back to Qur’an and Sunnah and look at the evidences. All people, all times.
You cannot invalidate the laws of the One who Created you.

6 04 2013
anime mouse pad

Both mouse pads must be exactly the same size, though.

If you are an office professional, you know how important a computer
is. Reference price: 23,999 yuan There is no doubt Intel The Core i7 is the world’s most powerful processor performance, but their impact will be Intel Intelligent trend over time in the future the concept of the main push.

30 04 2013
Bernardo

We’re a bunch of volunteers and starting a new scheme in our community. Your web site provided us with valuable info to work on. You have performed a formidable job and our whole group will be grateful to you.

27 05 2015
paket umroh hemat

Great information. Lucky me I found your blog by accident (stumbleupon).
I’ve bookmarked it for later!

13 08 2016
Shari LP

I have a question being a westerner who is tolerant of Muslims. How do I counter those who say, “Islam is not peaceful, look at its early years and compare that to how they are now!” Since Islam was the last kid on the block, those nations were presumably under other belief structures before Islam rolled up. They had to become Islamic nations so therefore some form of coup or force, which implies a lack of peace, had to be utilized to make them Islamic states. What is to stop that happening now?

The future NWO Noahide law religion says it will be heaven on earth…yeah for those who agree with it, the rest will be killed. They could say they are also peaceful (with an asterisk that says AFTER the law is compelled on everyone).

How do you address that?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s




%d bloggers like this: