Tagged: Book Meme

10 02 2008

Sumera has tagged me on this book meme, here are the rules:

 1. Pick up the nearest book (of at least 123 pages)

2. Open the book to page 123

3. Find the 5th Sentence.

4. Post the next 3 sentences

5. Tag 5 people

 

The nearest book to me meeting the above criteria is ‘Descartes – Key philosophical writings’ edited by Enrique chavez-Avizo.

“And inasmuch as often in this life greater rewards are offered for vice than for virtue, few people would prefer the right to the useful, were they restrained neither by the fear of God nor the expectations of another life. Although it is absolutely true that we must believe that there is a God, because we are so taught in the holy scriptures, and on the other hand we must believe the holy scriptures because they come from God. The reason for this is, that, faith being a gift of God, He who gives the grace to cause us to believe that He exists, we nevertheless could not place this argument before infidels, who might accuse us of reasoning in a circle.”

I tag Shahrzad, BubblesKhwab, Dr Marranci, and Amal

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13 responses

10 02 2008
Sumera

I like Descartes although have none of his works in my wee library (it is incredibly wee, only 2 bookshelves!) Only ever came across him during my library browsings. Im thinking of eventually taking up a philosophy module p/t at uni come next year 🙂 Something i’ve always wanted to do. Didnt you do Phil Tia? How did you find it?

11 02 2008
Hasmita

I did a philosophy module as part of my criminology degree, it was terribly boring.

11 02 2008
Woot! « Bubbles

[…] been tagged (Book Meme) simultanously by Tia and Chickpea. What a lovely […]

11 02 2008
Bubbles

Aaaah, Descartes… how did you find the book?

@ Hasmita, couldn’t agree more, pure philosophy is boring, they love perambulating only to conclude in the end that we can’t really know anything for sure. Pfft!

11 02 2008
Abdul.

Interesting book to have at hand! I’ve heard of Descartes in my ramblings but not really familiar with him.

12 02 2008
Shahrzad

Did you notice? The doubt of Descartes is fully or partially influenced by the doubt of “Ghazzali”.

I hope that the day will come when the philosophers-of the East and the West- will write about “Farabi” just as they are writing today about “Musa ibn Maymun”, that they become as familiar with the works of “Ibn Sina” and “Mulla Sadra” as they are with the writings of “Thomas Aquinas”, or they discuss “­Ghazzali”‘s philosophical works just like they discuss “Descartes”.
That would be the day when we can justifiably say that Islamic philosophy has been given the recognition and level it rightly deserves. 🙂

12 02 2008
Tia

Sumera you call two bookshelves wee? I did political philosophy, which is almost the same but concentrative towards governance and ideologies. I really enjoyed it and I know you will enjoy it too. BTW Sumera which field are you in you never said?

Hasmita, it can be boring if you don’t have a reason to study it. I’ve always found it boring until I got discussing with some philosophy students.

Bubbles, I haven’t actually read this particular book yet, I read bits and its been sitting on my desk since. Actually see the four books stacked on the right hand side of my blog’s banner, this book is second from top. Since quoting that text, i have sudden urge to finish reading it :p

Abdul its good book to have at hand. Descartes thoughts are mainly product of questioning the religious clergy and the persecution and suffering it caused. So his modern philosophy mainly concerns discussions surrounding, God, Self, free-will, knowledge etc using independent inquiry. This is also related to the point Shahrzad made about Muslim philosophers who discussed these issues much before.

Shahrzad, I think about a hundred years ago amongst the Westerners al-Farabi, Kindi, Ibn Sina, Ibn Khaldun were all central figures amongst the intellecutals who brought about the reformations. This was also the time when the works of these same people became obsolete in Muslim world. So Just like Muslims translated the works of the ancient Greek and Persian philosophers, the west did the same and the fact that works of Ibn Rushd, Ibn Sina, or even Ibn Khaldun were translated and available in French is quiet testimonial to the influence of Muslim philosophers.

12 02 2008
Book Meme Epidemy! « Shahrazad

[…] Meme Epidemy! February 13, 2008 — Shahrzad Achelois, Tia and Abdul tagged me on the book meme. Thank you for including […]

13 02 2008
Sumera

I consider a substantial book collection to at least span 3 bookshelves, hence why mine is wee 😀 I work in research – academic/social policy (usually on BME women on a wide range of topics – health (mental/physical)and violence(domestic, sexual, physical, as a result of trafficking etc) being just a few topics that I take an interest in and am currently working on)

15 02 2008
Amina Ae Sook

Lets also not forget other Eastern philosophers like Lao Tze and Confucius. Just as Westerners need to learn about Muslim philosopher, people in predominantly Muslim countries need to learn about their Eastern counterparts.

17 02 2008
Tia

Sumera that’s a very interesting line of work, you must really enjoy it.

Good point Amina, I must admitt I am little ignorant of Eastern philosophies,the only thing I know is the concept of old master. oh and I once read the ‘Art of War’ by Sun Tzu which imo is a masterpiece.

17 02 2008
Sumera

Yep, I love my field of work because I find it useful and it reflects reality. Much prefer it to brain dead IT.

19 02 2008
Tia

You are fortunate to be in a field which is useful to yourself, and no wonder you are so sensationally shrewed. MY work is terribly boring, involves lots of reading and lecturing when I rather be in some uni studying english literature :p

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